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Government
Public Works Office
Candice S. Miller
21777 Dunham Road, Clinton Township, MI 48036
(586) 469-5325

StormWater

Macomb County Design Standards for Stormwater Management

Phase II Stormwater Permit Activity Reporting Forms

All information from county departments and nested jurisdictions are due now.

SWPPI = Stormwater Pollution Prevention Initiative Forms

Environmental and Water Quality Information

The Macomb County Public Works Office has been overseeing the County’s National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) Storm Water Permit since 2001. The NPDES permit is a requirement of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency’s (EPA) Clean Water Act of 1972. The purpose of the permit is to control the discharge of pollutants into surface waters by imposing requirements to protect the environment through water quality monitoring, public education, good housekeeping and construction requirements. Macomb County has applied for a renewal of its permit and anticipates to have it issued in 2016.

NPDES Phase 2 Watershed Permit Annual Reports

NPDES Phase 2 Watershed Permit Annual Report 2007-2008

NPDES Phase 2 Watershed Permit Annual Report 2008-2009

NPDES Phase 2 Watershed Permit Annual Report 2009-2010

NPDES Phase 2 Watershed Permit Annual Report 2010-2011

NPDES Phase 2 Watershed Permit Annual Report 2011-2012

NPDES Phase 2 Watershed Permit Annual Report 2012-2013

NPDES Phase 2 Watershed Permit Annual Report 2013-2014

NPDES Phase 2 Watershed Permit Annual Report 2014-2015

Every two years, the County is required to summarize all of its efforts and report them to the Michigan Department of Environmental Quality (MDEQ), the agency overseeing permit activities and compliance in Michigan on behalf of the U.S. EPA. 

In order for us to be successful in protecting the health of our waterways, it takes the involvement and support of local businesses, residents and visitors. Please review the following tips to see how you can do your part. 

Remember, it all drains to our lakes and rivers.

Did you know we all live on a lake or stream? It’s true -- we might not be able to see it from our window, but it’s there. It might be a small stream or ditch or even the storm drain in the street. All of these lead to a river or lake. So it’s important to remember that what we do at home affects our rivers and lakes!

Here are some simple steps you can take to help keep our water clean. Give them a try. A few simple changes can make a big difference! Plus, you’ll save time and money in the process.

Help keep pollution out of storm drains

  1. Fertilize sparingly and caringly
  2. Carefully store and dispose of household cleaners, chemicals, and oil
  3. Clean up after your pet
  4. Practice good car care
  5. Choose earth friendly landscaping

Help keep pollution out of storm drains

 

What’s the issue?

Storm drains lead directly to our lakes and streams. So, any oil, pet waste, leaves, or dirty water from washing your car that enters a storm drain gets into our lakes and streams. With almost five million people living in Southeast Michigan, we all need to be aware of what goes into our storm drains. Remember, only rain in the drain!

What are some helpful tips?

Here are some simple steps you can take to help keep pollutants out of storm drains and keep our water clean. Give them a try. A few simple changes can make a big difference!

Sweep it. Do you have extra fertilizer, grass clippings, or dirt on your driveway? Sweep it back onto your lawn. Hosing your driveway sends these pollutants into storm drains that lead to our lakes and streams.

Keep it clean. Whether in the street or in your yard, remember to keep leaves, grass clippings, trash, and fertilizers out of storm drains.

Only rain in the drain. Never dump motor oil, chemicals, pet waste, dirty or soapy water, or anything else down the storm drain. All of these materials pollute our lakes and streams.

Label it. Volunteer to label storm drains in your neighborhood to inform residents that storm drains flow directly to our lakes and streams. Encourage citizens to contact their local community for more information on storm drain stenciling programs.

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Information about Clinton River water quality and events

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Southeast Michigan Council of Governments

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Michigan Department of Environmental Quality